5 Tips For Building A Relationship With Your Child

Author: Valerie Stout Cyrus
Published: Oct 27 2013

Whether you are preparing for the birth of your child or you have just brought your newborn home from the hospital, you may be wondering what you can do to foster a close relationship with your baby. It is very important that you and your baby bond with each other in the first few weeks of his or her life. This bonding will in fact be the basis on which every other relationship in his or her life is founded. If you want to make sure that you and your baby have a good relationship with each other throughout life, and that your child will go on to develop happy and healthy relationships with others in the future, you should consider these guidelines as you learn how to care for your newborn in the first few weeks of his or her life.

Tips for building relationship with child

Playtime

A great way to bond with your baby is through playtime. When you engage in playtime, both of you have fun with each other and relax while spending time together. You lose the inhibition that makes you stressed out about everyday life, and your baby delights in the fact that you are shaking rattles, playing musical toys, and playing with other toys with him.

It doesn't matter what type of toys you play with as long as you are engaging your baby in a fun activity. Toys that are made from a child's point of view like Baby Einstein by Disney provide hours of fun for both parent and child. The baby is introduced to all the different sounds and colors that make up their world and parents get to observe these precious moments.

Physical Contact

The primary way that you can bond with your baby is through physical contact. Rather than let your baby lie in a bassinet or crib throughout the day, you should make it a point to hold them closely, rock them when they get fussy, and cuddle with them frequently. Breastfeeding is also a great way for mothers to bond with their newborns, as breastfeeding encourages this natural closeness.

Talking

Many new parents underestimate the importance of talking with your newborn. You may feel silly talking to your baby because you think that your child cannot yet understand what you are saying. However, pediatricians argue that your talking to them helps your baby identify your voice and encourages her to prefer your voice over others. You also benefit from talking to your baby when your child responds to you with smiles, coos, and giggles.

Baby Wearing

Many parents today keep their babies close and continue the bonding experience throughout the day by wearing their babies. When they carry them in a sling that wraps around their own bodies, parents continue the physical contact that is so vital to a good parent-child relationship. Babies feel secure because they are close to their parents, and parents benefit by being assured that their little ones are close and safe while the whole family is out in public or enjoying time at home.

Co-Sleeping

Many safety experts continue to debate this practice and whether or not parents today can safely sleep with their newborns alongside them. Even so, parents and babies have been sharing the same bed for eons. Mothers throughout the world tuck their little ones in bed next to them each night, which helps babies bond to their mothers, as well as breastfeed during the night without waking up the entire family. Before you co-sleep with your baby, however, you should research the ways that you can engage in this practice safely and make sure your husband or partner is okay with it.

Bonding with your baby is vital in the first few weeks of his or her life. Use these tips as a starting point and add different activities until you find a few that work best for your child and you.

Valerie Stout Cyrus is a freelance writer who frequently researches parenting issues. She has personally purchased Baby Einstein by Disney products for her own children and has found them to be great fun for both babies and parents.

Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/msittig/610594335/

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