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How do you know if you're depressed?

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To cut a long story short, just over a month ago I was hospitalized for over twelve day's over a severe kidney infection which I was also diagnosed with other things. Since coming out of the ICU, I don't interact with anyone anymore, I have pushed all my friends away. I cry on several days. I have lost all confidence, Going out to places is difficult as I tend to get nervous and my hands tremble, only in crowds of people though. Apart of me wish I'd never came out of that hospital. Do I seem depressed or is this just a faze?

How do you know if you're depressed?

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Yes, you could be depressed. Common after a serious illness. Go back to your Dr. and tell him/her what you have posted here.

How do you know if you're depressed?

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I went to the search engine and typed in "depression symptons" and under WebMD.com it said the below. I've had severe, untreated, prolonged (3 weeks) depression and, untreated, it caused me to have a nervous breakdown, which is like falling off of a cliff, and you don't know what's going to happen to you. You don't want one of those. The weight of the depression caused my brain to crack, from the stress and pressure. It couldn't hold up any longer. The don't want to treat your brain like I did, like a dog. Be nice to your brain, your brain has tried to be nice to you. One of the problems I had with depression was that I couldn't make decisions. I couldn't decide if I was depressed, of if I was, what to do, and when to do it, and whom to contact for help, and if I knew of someone, did I have the mental and physical strength to call them? It was just constant round in mental circles, 100 times a day, no point A to point B sense of direction. Also feeling of if I got help, what if the appointment was for in 2 or 3 weeks? How was I going to hold on that long? What was I supposed to do in the mean time? I could figure out none of that. Plus I had a negative mindset, which doubly, made me feel that I couldn't do any of that. Plus, I felt it wasn't going to do any good anyway, I was depressed, nothing could help me. But it can. Anti-depressants helped me and they can help you. As for what to do. I've made it sound so confusing, I don't know. Well, if you live with someone, that can help, assuming that person is positive and wants to help you. If you live alone, that can make it harder, for you have no one right there who can help, assuming they are willing. What to do? It's not going to be easy but it can be done. Even WebMD.com said on its website a few minutes ago, said, "Who to contact in your area if you are depressed," I clicked the button and it said, "This page is no longer in service," or something like that, which, I'm not even depressed (because I'm taking an anti-depressant), and it's frustrating to me. And if you're depressed, that's frustrating as heck. OK, simply because WebMD's page on who to find for help in your area is not working, doesn't mean the Yellow Pages directory on your computer is not working. It is. This is what you do. 1. Go to the telephone Yellow Pages for our area on your computer. 2. If you can afford a psychiatrist, look up the names of some in your area, man or woman, as you choose. Write down the names, phone number and addresses of the one(s) you want to call. 3. Call one. 4. See what they say about an appointment. 5. Tell them you are really depressed, and can they work you in as soon as possible, like in the next few days. (If they can't ask them, what am I supposed to do in the meantime?) 6. Here's an idea. Don't call, just go to an emergency room that you're comfortable with, one near you, one you like, one that's not crowded. (Downtown city hospitals are crowded. Might consider a hospital ER that's in the suburbs, and you might have less wait. 7. Pick one. Don't call them. Just go. You'll have an appointment in a hour from now. That's pretty quick, huh? 8. As for paying for it, are you on medicare (senior) or medicaid (poor)? Do you have private health insurance? 9. Since it's the start of a work week (Monday at my place), get moving on this now, for psychiatrists and mental health clinics are in their offices right now. Their secretaries are sitting by the phone, right now. If you wait till Friday at 4 p.m., they're all fixing to go home. 10. Take advantage that this is Monday. Get busy on the computer yellow pages (look up: psychiatrists and/or mental health clinics (free for people who have no money)for your home town, and write down some numbers and names and addresses, 3 or 4 of them, right now. 11. Then call 3 or 4 of the numbers, and write down what they say. 12. Some of the people who answer the phone are going to be very helpful and nice, and will help you set up an appointment, and you're going to feel like a queen. 13. Remember, all you have to do is look up the names and phone numbers and addresses of these psychiatrists or mental (psychological) health clinics, and the people who answer the phones are going to do the rest, are going to be helpful. 14. Give them a chance to be your friend. 15. Go to the appointment. 16. Tell them you want one fast, they should be set up to handle that. 17. If not, call another clinic/psy., and cancel the first appt. if the second one is faster. 18. Oh, yeah, I've been there. I didn't do any of this stuff, and I had a nervous breakdown. 19. Since that horrible experience, and my not doing anything about it for 3 weeks, I have a saying which I've heard and I like to repeat to myself and to others: "Looking for a helping hand? What about the one on the end of your arm?" 20. You need to toughen up for a little while, gather all the concentration you can, look up those numbers, then call them, then go to the appointment. 21. One or two hours of concentration, decision making and effort can reach your goal. Give yourself those one or two hours. 22. Let us know what's going on as you go through this. Here's WebMD.com below about depression: (below webMD.com) What Are Symptoms of Depression? According to the National Institute of Mental Health, symptoms of depression may include the following: • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions • Fatigue and decreased energy • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping • Irritability, restlessness • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex • Overeating or appetite loss • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts How Are Symptoms of Depression Treated? If a physical cause for the symptoms of depression is ruled out, your doctor may begin an initial treatment himself or herself, or else refer you to a psychologist, psychiatrist, or other mental health professional for further evaluation and treatment. This mental health specialist will determine the best course of treatment. That treatment may include medicines (such as antidepressants), psychotherapy, or a combination of both. Untreated clinical depression is a serious problem. Untreated depression increases the chance of risky behaviors such as drug or alcohol addiction. It also can ruin relationships, cause problems at work, and make it difficult to overcome serious illnesses. Clinical depression, also known as major depression, is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. Clinical depression affects the way you eat and sleep. It affects the way you feel about yourself and those around you. It even affects your thoughts. People who are depressed cannot simply “pull themselves together” and be cured. Without proper treatment, including antidepressants and/or psychotherapy, untreated clinical depression can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people with depression If Left Untreated Untreated clinical depression is a serious problem. Untreated depression increases the chance of risky behaviors such as drug or alcohol addiction. It also can ruin relationships, cause problems at work, and make it difficult to overcome serious illnesses. Clinical depression, also known as major depression, is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. Clinical depression affects the way you eat and sleep. It affects the way you feel about yourself and those around you. It even affects your thoughts. People who are depressed cannot simply “pull themselves together” and be cured. Without proper treatment, including antidepressants and/or psychotherapy, untreated clinical depression can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people with depression.

How do you know if you're depressed?

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Thank you both for your responses, much appreciated. I live in the UK so hospitals here are the NHS so isn't really a problem getting help. I have another hospital appointment on Friday as I feel like my symptoms are coming back. I went the doctors today but I could only see a nurse so wasn't much help and I didn't want to annoy her with my emotional problems as she was more concerned about a physical problem. I do live on my own so I tend to get worse emotionally. I have pushed all my friends away and I don't want any help as I feel like they're only pitying me.

How do you know if you're depressed?

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Your emotions can affect your physical health. Your physical AND emotional health will NOT be annoying to your health care workers - Drs. and nurses. Your emotions can affect your physical health. Tell them everything!!

How do you know if you're depressed?

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So, can we breath easier? You scared us. Thanks for letting us know what's going on, and also, so others can follow you path. If you and I can do it, anybody can. Let us know what they say during your hospital visit on Friday.

How do you know if you're depressed?

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I wasn't aware that your emotions could effect your health so thank you for letting me know that. As for breathing, I am trying haha. I have done some research on the side effects to my conditions I had, high risk of developing PTSD so I will mention this to my doctors. Thank you all for taking the time to respond to my post, much appreciated.

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