Dark Knight Anxiety - A Criminal Mood Change?

Author: A Bailey
Published: Aug 23 2012

With the recent string of Dark Knight inspired crimes all across the country, U.S. psychoanalysts are beginning to wonder if the movie itself is a trigger for certain psychological issues. Experts have all but given it a name - Dark Knight Anxiety Disorder"- and the idea is beginning to stick.

Storytelling and the Criminal Mood Change

Stories are the most powerful psychological change agents in the world. The Batman franchise affects people so deeply because its story has roots in many of the troubles that ail us today. It is understandable why individuals would leave the movies troubled and anxious about the world as a whole. The villains in these movies reflect the things many of us see and feel in the world today.

In "The Dark Knight" (2008), the Joker rails against modern decadence and materialism, wanting only to "burn it all down." In "The Dark Knight Rises" (2012), Bane skillfully taps into popular resentment of the upper classes to bring Gotham to its knees. These themes tie in very nicely to our society's current fears. We worry about foreclosure, job insecurity, retirement funds in the stock market, the widening gap between the poor/middle and upper classes, and the future of U.S. global influence. Seeing the films in the Dark Knight franchise may heighten these anxieties and trigger the onset of a psychological disorder.

Anxiety Disorders and Criminal Defense

Anxiety disorders can lead troubled individuals to make bad decisions that result in criminal acts. Individuals can dissociate from reality, trapped in their world of painful terror. Those who commit crimes while suffering from anxiety disorders need psychiatric care. Jail time will only serve to worsen their condition and may even put them at risk to offend again once released.

If you believe that you or a loved one committed a crime while under the influence of the Dark Knight anxiety disorder, our Orlando criminal defense lawyer suggests you contact legal help today. Precedents have been set that may make this detail an important part of your defense strategy.

What to Do if You Feel Anxious

The Batman villains get their power because of a sense of nihilism that often creeps into modern day existence. We work so hard that we often forget the love that drove us to work hard in the first place - love of life, love of family, love of career or love of a particular ideal. With the faltering economy, we may feel as though all this work just isn't accomplishing what we expected or what we were "promised." We may feel kinship with villains who just want to burn everything to the ground.

This is normal. The best thing to do if you feel this way is to take a step back from the hustle and bustle of your life and check in with yourself. Write your thoughts in a journal if you have one, or take an afternoon to remind yourself of who you are and what you believe in. If need be, start the slow process of re-evaluating life choices. Remember that you have all the time in the world to figure out what you want.

Where to Go From Here

While it is okay to be affected by a movie, it is not okay to commit a crime based on that movie. If you are truly concerned that you might be on the verge of making a bad or potentially criminal choice, get the help you need before it's too late. Contact a licensed therapist or schedule a consultation with a defense lawyer as soon as possible.

A Bailey, a former journalist, writes guest articles for the Orlando criminal defense lawyer group of Katz & Phillips. relating to issues about those arrested and charged with criminal offenses, from domestic violence to federal hate crimes. Retaining qualified legal help early on is this firm's best advice for anyone fearing possible mood anxiety, resulting in criminal behavior.

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